From Learning from Las Vegas, by Venturi, Brown and Izenour (1972).

From Learning from Las Vegas, by Venturi, Brown and Izenour (1972).

"As modern pop grew up, it would subtly attempt to reintroduce elements that had been cast aside in rock ‘n’ roll’s birthing. If we can say that the Shadows were bringing the influence of Mantovani back into the charts, then it’s safe to say Elvis was channeling Mario Lanza on ‘It’s Now or Never (UK and US no. 1 ‘60) and, most obviously, at the climax of ‘Surrender’ (UK and US no. 1 ‘61). Elvis was trying to recapture the intangible magic of the music he had grown up with; in turn, the sixties beat era would be a twenty-something’s recap of their Elvis moment, reigniting the thrill they had felt when they first heard ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ as young teenagers. T. Rextasy would reference Beatlemania – and the process continued. This was one of modern pop’s magical properties: by participating, you could be more than just a consumer – you were helping to create pop history. There came a point where you realized you were a scholar with access to a personal, hand-built library rather than a rotten pupil who had been bunking off school to buy seven-inch singles."

— Bob Stanley, Yeah Yeah Yeah – The History of Modern Pop, p. 23

magictransistor:

Hannah Höch

magictransistor:

Hannah Höch

hipinuff:

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian: 1866 -1944), Two large parallel lines supported by simple curve, 1925.

hipinuff:

Wassily Kandinsky (Russian: 1866 -1944), Two large parallel lines supported by simple curve, 1925.

(via butt420plug)

"Starglow dwarf china rose shrubthorn
lantern fashion-fare airing car-tire crushed
young’s churching old rambler’s flown
to sky cane cut back
a crown transplanted patient of
drought sun’s gold firerimmed branched
greeting thyme’s autumn spring head
happier winter sculpt white rose"

— Louis Zukofsky, “Starglow”, from 80 Flowers, 1978.

"Let no one believe, however, that the “cultivated” Englishman openly brags with his egotism. On the contrary, he conceals it under the vilest hypocrisy. What? The wealthy English fail to remember the poor? They who have founded philanthropic institutions, such as no other country can boast of! Philanthropic institutions forsooth! As though you rendered the proletarians a service in first sucking out their very life-blood and then practising your self-complacent, Pharisaic philanthropy upon them, placing yourselves before the world as mighty benefactors of humanity when you give back to the plundered victims the hundredth part of what belongs to them! Charity which degrades him who gives more than him who takes; charity which treads the downtrodden still deeper in the dust, which demands that the degraded, the pariah cast out by society, shall first surrender the last that remains to him, his very claim to manhood, shall first beg for mercy before your mercy deigns to press, in the shape of an alms, the brand of degradation upon his brow."

— Friedrich Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England (1845)

"Gothic architecture is not, fundamentally, based on spheres, cones and cylinders. Only the nave is an expression of a simple form, but of a complex geometry of the second order (intersecting arches). It is for that reason that a cathedral is not very beautiful and that we search in it for compensations of a subjective kind outside plastic art. A cathedral interests us as the ingenious solution of a difficult problem, but a problem of which the postulates have been badly stated because they do not proceed from the great primary forms. The cathedral is not a plastic work; it is a drama; a fight against the force of gravity, which is a sensation of a sentimental nature."

— Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture, p. 30.

"Art has truly ceased to be individual, even when the artist is himself a confirmed individualist, for, even as we neglect individuals, we can trace across the moments of their separate thoughts, a vast argument that borrows from their conscious intervention only in passing."

— Louis Aragon, La Peinture au défi (1930).

Eduardo Paolozzi, Parrot (1964).

Eduardo Paolozzi, Parrot (1964).

theladybadass:

Alice Prin (aka Kiki de Montparnasse) in Dadaist 1924 short film, Ballet Mécanique

(via scumsl0th)