thechemistryset:

Thamesmead, south-east London, 1974

thechemistryset:

Thamesmead, south-east London, 1974

"

The Eliminator overloads the eye whenever the red neon flashes on, and in so doing diminishes the viewer’s memory dependencies or traces. Memory vanishes, while looking at the Eliminator. The viewer doesn’t know what he is looking at, because he has no surface space to fixate on; thus he becomes aware of the emptiness of his own sight or sees through his sight. Light, mirror reflection, and shadow fabricate the perceptual intake of the eyes. Unreality becomes actual and solid.

The Eliminator is a clock that doesn’t keep time, but loses it. The intervals between the flashes of neon are “void intervals” or what George Kubler calls, “the rupture between past and future.” The Eliminator order negative time as it avoids historical space.

"

— Robert Smithson, The Eliminator (1964).

Drawing by Carl-Henning Pedersen.

Drawing by Carl-Henning Pedersen.

Asger Jorn, Månmannen (The Moon Man), 1953, ceramic sculpture.

Asger Jorn, Månmannen (The Moon Man), 1953, ceramic sculpture.

Tags: communism

"First of all, music for the sake of music, or art f or art’s sake is a very young slogan, not more than a hundred years old. The great masters in the history of music never used such slogans. For example, Johann Sebastian Bach said of himself, “My duty is to serve the Lord and the Church with my music.” His feelings were not so much those of an artist as those of an artisan or preacher. Beethoven was thoroughly influenced by his times, the era of the great French Revolution. If you read Wagner’s theoretical writings from 1848, you will find that they are directly antagonistic to slogans such as “art for art’s sake."

— From Hanns Eisler’s Speech to the Choir of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union, 1938

"Rhymes are dangerous things, forging connections which can never be broken. Rhymes are addictive. They clog up memory files."

— Iain Sinclair, London Orbital, p. 59.

"Trotsky and we who followed him failed to distinguish between first, means of production in the hands of the state where the state is merely an economic form like a trust, a bank, or a cartel; second, state ownership as a purely juridical relation, which tells us no more than that it is the duty of the state to organize production and distribute the product; and third, a workers’ state, i.e. a state transitional to socialism; this last is not a juridical question at all but a question of economic conditions and social relations of production, which can be summed up in one phrase: is the working class master or not?"

— C.L.R James, 1941 (via class-struggle-anarchism)

t3chn0ir:

'What are you doing up so late? … I'm counting the stars … Do you really know all their names? … Yes I do … How many did you count? … A hundred … There are more than a hundred … I know … Why did you stop? … A hundred is enough, once you've counted a hundred all the other hundreds are the same'
Drowning By Numbers (1988)

t3chn0ir:

'What are you doing up so late? … I'm counting the stars … Do you really know all their names? … Yes I do … How many did you count? … A hundred … There are more than a hundred … I know … Why did you stop? … A hundred is enough, once you've counted a hundred all the other hundreds are the same'

Drowning By Numbers (1988)