"First of all, music for the sake of music, or art f or art’s sake is a very young slogan, not more than a hundred years old. The great masters in the history of music never used such slogans. For example, Johann Sebastian Bach said of himself, “My duty is to serve the Lord and the Church with my music.” His feelings were not so much those of an artist as those of an artisan or preacher. Beethoven was thoroughly influenced by his times, the era of the great French Revolution. If you read Wagner’s theoretical writings from 1848, you will find that they are directly antagonistic to slogans such as “art for art’s sake."

— From Hanns Eisler’s Speech to the Choir of the International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union, 1938

"Rhymes are dangerous things, forging connections which can never be broken. Rhymes are addictive. They clog up memory files."

— Iain Sinclair, London Orbital, p. 59.

"Trotsky and we who followed him failed to distinguish between first, means of production in the hands of the state where the state is merely an economic form like a trust, a bank, or a cartel; second, state ownership as a purely juridical relation, which tells us no more than that it is the duty of the state to organize production and distribute the product; and third, a workers’ state, i.e. a state transitional to socialism; this last is not a juridical question at all but a question of economic conditions and social relations of production, which can be summed up in one phrase: is the working class master or not?"

— C.L.R James, 1941 (via class-struggle-anarchism)

t3chn0ir:

'What are you doing up so late? … I'm counting the stars … Do you really know all their names? … Yes I do … How many did you count? … A hundred … There are more than a hundred … I know … Why did you stop? … A hundred is enough, once you've counted a hundred all the other hundreds are the same'
Drowning By Numbers (1988)

t3chn0ir:

'What are you doing up so late? … I'm counting the stars … Do you really know all their names? … Yes I do … How many did you count? … A hundred … There are more than a hundred … I know … Why did you stop? … A hundred is enough, once you've counted a hundred all the other hundreds are the same'

Drowning By Numbers (1988)

"Any fact is, in a sense, ‘significant.’ Any fact may be ‘symptomatic,’ but certain facts give one a sudden insight into circumjacent conditions into their causes, their effects, into sequence, and law …These facts are hard to find. They are swift and easy of transmission. They govern knowledge as the switchboard governs an electric circuit."

— Ezra Pound, in The New Age, Dec. 1911 (Selected Prose, p. 22–23)

Tags: ezra pound

grupaok:

Pierre-Ambroise Richebourg, Barricades of the Paris Commune, April 1871. Near Hôtel de Ville and the Rue de Rivoli.

grupaok:

Pierre-Ambroise Richebourg, Barricades of the Paris Commune, April 1871. Near Hôtel de Ville and the Rue de Rivoli.

Photography by Christer Strömholm, from Poste Restante (1967)

Photography by Christer Strömholm, from Poste Restante (1967)

"But why hadn’t the TV set reverted instead to formless metals and plastics? Those, after all, were its constituents; it had been constructed out of them, not out of an earlier radio. Perhaps this weirdly verified a discarded ancient philosophy, that of Plato’s ideal objects, the universals which, in each class, were real. The form TV set had been a template imposed as a successor to other templates, like the procession of frames in a movie sequence. Prior forms, he reflected, must carry on an invisible, residual life in every object. The past is latent, is submerged, but still there, capable of rising to the surface once the later imprinting unfortunately—and against ordinary experience—vanished. The man contains—not the boy—but earlier men, he thought. History began a long time ago."

— Philip K. Dick, Ubik, p. 129

Tags: ubik

firsttimeuser:

Street Musicians Standing, c. 1854
photo by Charles Nègre